Reasons to Plan Ahead for Selling a Home

Selling a home may prove to be a long, exhausting journey, particularly for those who fail to plan ahead. In fact, there are many reasons for home sellers to map out the home selling journey, and these reasons include:

1. You can identify any potential home selling pitfalls.

Although selling a home should be a quick, seamless process, problems may occur without notice that prevent you from optimizing the value of your house. Fortunately, if you plan ahead for selling your house, you can take the necessary steps to identify and address potential home selling pitfalls.

For example, conducting a home inspection before you list your residence may prove to be exceedingly valuable. This inspection enables a property expert to detect any underlying problems with your home. Then, you can use the inspection findings to prioritize home improvement projects. And once you complete these projects, you can enhance your house, increasing the likelihood of a profitable home sale.

2. You can improve your house’s appearance.

Let’s face it – few homebuyers likely will be attracted to a home with a messy, cluttered front lawn. Luckily, a home seller who prepares for the home selling journey can revamp a house’s exterior and eliminate any eyesores.

A home seller may notice assorted home exterior problems if he or she takes an objective approach. By doing so, a home seller can consider a homebuyer’s perspective and devote the necessary time and resources to bolster a house’s curb appeal.

With a stunning home exterior, a house is likely to stand out from similar properties that are available. As a result, a home with superior curb appeal may generate lots of interest from potential buyers as soon as it becomes available.

3. You can get the support that you need to succeed.

No home seller should be forced to move along the home selling journey alone. If you hire a real estate agent before you list your house, however, you can get the support that you need to succeed.

A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of selling a house and can help you plan accordingly. Therefore, this housing market professional will make it easy for you to get the best price for your house, regardless of the current real estate sector’s conditions.

Typically, a real estate agent will meet with you and learn about you and your house. This housing market professional next will tailor his or her home selling efforts to ensure that you can achieve your desired results.

A real estate agent also is ready to respond to any home selling question. For a real estate agent, there is no such thing as a “bad” question. This means you can ask a real estate agent any question about selling your house, and this housing market professional will provide you with a thoughtful response.

Clearly, there are many reasons to plan ahead for the home selling journey. If you start planning to list your house, you can improve your chances of enjoying a successful home selling experience.

Home Selling Tips for Property Owners

Sometimes the simplest habits can yield the greatest results. Making to-do lists is the perfect example of a productive habit — especially if you’re getting ready to sell your home.

When putting your house on the market, here are a few tips to keep in mind for staying on track and avoiding delays.

Organization: As a home seller, there are a lot of things you can do to prepare your house for real estate showings.

Making lists can be an extremely effective way to reinforce goals, clarify objectives, and remind yourself what needs to be done. Knowing your priorities for the day (and week) can strengthen your confidence and help you avoid that feeling of being overwhelmed. On the other hand, when you lack clarity and keep forgetting important tasks, frustration and pessimism can creep in, causing you to lose your edge.

Like any method of staying organized and focused, making lists is not without its potential pitfalls. Priority lists are of little use if they get misplaced, buried under other documents, or forgotten about for days or weeks. Ideally, your list of important tasks should be readily accessible, highly visible, and regularly updated. While some people like to use old-fashioned written lists in a spiral-bound notebook or legal-size pad of paper, others may prefer their mobile devices, computer, or a reminder app.

The benefit of creating a list and checking off items as you progress is that it helps keep you focused, goal oriented, and organized. The sooner you create a priority list of tasks, the greater your efficiency will be in getting them done.

Motivation: Although your real estate agent will handle most of the details related to selling your home, there are still dozens of tasks you’ll need to be involved in. Keeping your home and property well maintained, presentable, and in a state of good repair are among them. If you’re like most home sellers, however, your plate is already full with family responsibilities, career demands, and other obligations. Fortunately, there are strategies for balancing your priorities.

The three keys to getting important stuff done in a timely way are: effective time management, prioritization, and staying motivated. Selling a house is a team effort involving you, your family, your real estate agent, and other professionals. Doing your utmost to keep your real estate objectives on the “front burner” will help keep the sales process moving forward and make a good impression on potential buyers.

Goals, in general, should be specific, attainable, measurable, and deadline-oriented. As motivational writer Napoleon Hill said, “A goal is a dream with a deadline.” When you fail to assign a target date or deadline to a house-selling task, it’s all-too-easy to let that goal slide and cause you to lose your advantage.

How To Pass The Home Inspection Easily

There are few things for a home seller that are more stressful than the home inspection. You hope and pray that everything will come out a-OK in your house so that your buyers will want to continue with the sale without asking for too many contingencies. There’s a few simple things that you can do to make sure your home inspection goes smoothly. The good news is that these tasks won’t cost you a lot of time or money. A few simple actions can save you a lot of grief in unnecessary service calls. Check out these tips to help you get through the home inspection with flying colors:

Check Your Light Bulbs

If you have a light bulb that’s simply burnt out, that could prompt the need for a check of the entire electrical system in your home. Avoid a costly visit from an electrician just by checking your light bulbs and replacing them where necessary. 

Check Your Air Filters 

The air filters in your home can be easily neglected and be a big problem in the home inspection process. Even if a filter looks a little gray, take the time to replace it. You should check your air filters and furnace filters for any potential problems like tears or excess dirt. For bonus points, you may want to just replace the filters before the inspection no matter how little dirt they have on them. Otherwise, a clogged filter can be a sign that your furnace or heating and cooling system isn’t working properly. 

Check Your Sinks

A few dollars spent on some drain unclogging chemicals is a few hundred dollars potentially saved on a plumber. Fill up your sinks with water and see how they drain. If they’re a bit slow, get the chemicals that you need to work on unclogging the drains (such as Drain-o). If there’s a funny smell coming from the drain, be sure to address it. Lemons also work wonders on everything from drains to garbage disposals. Even some baking soda and vinegar can help to clean a drain wonderfully. 

Fix Major Repairs Before Your Home Goes On The Market

If you know something pressing needs to be fixed or replaced in your home, be sure to fix it before the home even goes on the market. It’s much easier to take care of things before a buyer’s contingency and a time limit is involved. Although you may be hesitant to spend the money, you should replace certain appliances, fix the roof, or address that creaky floor before the “For Sale” sign even goes out front.

How to Avoid a Low Home Appraisal

A house needs to be sold three times when it is on the market. First it needs to be sold to other agents so they will want to show and sell the home. Second it needs to be sold to buyers and lastly to the appraiser. Even if the buyer is willing to pay a certain price for a home they usually need a mortgage. That means it is actually the bank who is buying the home. The bank wants to protect their investment so they do an appraisal. When the appraisal comes back low or as an under-appraisal deals can fall apart.

If you are a seller or a buyer you need to know how to protect yourself from short appraisals? Here are some suggestions from Bankrate.com for buyers and sellers.

If you’re a buyer:

— Tell your lender to find an appraiser who comes from your county, or perhaps a neighboring county.

— Request that the appraiser have a residential appraiser certification and a professional designation. Examples include the Appraisal Institute’s senior residential appraiser, or SRA, or member of the Appraisal Institute, or MAI, designations.

— Meet the appraiser when he or she inspects the home and share your knowledge of recent short sales and foreclosures that might skew the comps.

“Many appraisers are just pulling up data out of MLS (Multiple Listing Service) or off the deed at the courthouse and not checking it out,” Sellers says. “Most good appraisers will appreciate the information.”

And yes, you can speak with your appraiser; the prohibition only applies to your lender.

If you’re a seller:

–·Get an appraisal before you list a home. Search for a qualified appraiser in your area on the Appraisal Institute website.

— Use the appraisal to set a realistic listing price for your home.

— Give a copy of your pre-listing appraisal to the buyer’s appraiser. The more professional appraisers will understand that you’re just trying to add more data and another perspective.

— Question a low appraisal. There’s always a chance the appraiser or a supervisor will take into account new or overlooked information.