How To Help Kids Adjust To A Move

Moving is a big adjustment for any of us, yet it can be hardest on the children in our lives. Moving can mean a new school for your kids and a whole lot of unfamiliar faces. There are a few ways that you can help kids adjust to the change of moving to a new place and help them to feel at home faster. 

Let Them Be Involved With The New House


As a child, it can seem like moving into a new house is all about adults. Kids may feel that they’re merely along for the ride. You can let the kids pick out some things in the house. What color should their room be? Can the kids give some input on a new piece of furniture? Make moving a family affair and allow everyone in the family to feel included to make the transition smoother. 

Get Enrolled In Local Activities

See what types of local activities are available for the kids (and you) to be enrolled in. From tennis lessons to summer camp to after school activities, there’s plenty of things in a community that you and your family can get involved in. If you can find an activity to participate in with your kids, it will only make it easier for them to feel comfortable meeting other kids. You can also get acquainted with other adults to get some more information and insight about your new community. Making new friends and doing something they love will help your kids to feel right at home. The kids will feel more comfortable i their new school as well if they get involved.  

Help Kids Stay In Touch With Old Friends

Moving isn’t all about making new friends. Kids can still keep in touch with their old friends. If you didn’t move very far away, schedule dates for your kids to meet up with their old friends. If you have moved across states, encourage your kids to keep in touch with old friends through phone calls and video chat meetings. They’ll know that someday, they’ll see each other in person again. These actions can help in the transition of moving as well, since kids will see that their old lives have not been completely lost and forgotten about.

Stroll Around The Neighborhood As A Family

One great way to get adjusted to a new neighborhood is to explore it by foot. Make it a point to take an evening stroll as a family. The kids can learn a bit more about the area and begin to feel more comfortable in their surroundings with your help. You’ll also make discoveries about your new surroundings as a family.

Declutter And Reduce Stress At The Same Time

The thought of trying to declutter your home could stress you out. If you put off the act of organizing, however, you could end up even more stressed out. Clutter in the home is proven to be a cause of stress. Not being able to find what you need can cause you to feel that you’re living in chaos. There’s a few tips that you can take into consideration to help you declutter, destress, and get organized for good! 

When Planning Storage Solutions, Measure First

If you shop for containers and other storage organization tools first, you’ll never know what will fit properly. Taking the time to measure things out and get the right size containers can help you to avoid creating more clutter for yourself. Measuring spaces helps you to come up with a plan for what your vision is for that space.

Declutter For Less

You don’t need to go into a huge debt to declutter your home. You can shop at the local dollar store to find containers, hooks, and bins to help you stay organized. Organization doesn’t need a lot of fancy tools. 

For Kids, More Is Better

When it comes to finding containers and bins for a child’s room, more is definitely better.  Having many separate compartments really helps the kids to stay organized and find what they’re looking for when they want it. 

A Junk Drawer Is Actually A Good Thing

You can actually keep that junk drawer or bin that you have in the house. A junk drawer is a great place for collecting items. Just learn to keep it organized. If you have a bin, make sure that you clean it out from time to time so that tons of things don’t end up building up there in a pile. If you have a junk drawer, try to compartmentalize it with categories and separators for a “lost and found” or “things that need to be put away.”

Every Door Is An Opportunity

In your home, think of each and every door, cabinet door, or closet door as an opportunity to create more storage. You can hang things on the backs of these doors including spice racks, shoe racks, hooks for coats, and so much more. Don’t miss out on a simple yet very effective space saver.

  

Create Zones

In each room, there’s places where the same activity is done over and over again. Creating zones helps to reduce clutter and increase organization. In the kitchen, for example, you probably have a dedicated prep space along with a clean up station. In bedrooms, there’s a place where you get dressed, throw your dirty clothes, and get ready for the day. Have everything that you’ll need in each “station” or “zone” so that you can stay on top of being tidy.

All the Ingredients for a Fun Stay-home Date Night

One of the best ways to nurture a relationship with a significant other is to set aside time to spend with each other. For some people, that means working on hobbies together, grabbing a bite together, or just hanging out and watching 5+ episodes of Supernatural on Netflix. If you’re looking for some fun ideas for a date night with your S.O. but don’t want to go through all the trouble of getting dressed up and waiting for a table, we’ve got you covered. Here are some great stay-at-home date nights to share with your significant other.

1. Host a tasting event for two

Wine, whiskey, beer, cheese, chocolate… there are endless items to base a tasting on. Head to the supermarket and liquor store and pick out an array of small-sized treats and beverages. The set-up is half the fun. Spread them out on a table with candle, play some music you both like and give ratings to each item as you taste.

2. Cook a new recipe together

Pick a recipe that looks challenging and involved and buy all the ingredients the day before. Make sure you work together to make the meal; you’ll feel like you’ve accomplished something tricky together and it will be worth the reward. And even if you fail miserably at the recipe, there’s always the option of getting pizza delivered.

3. Picnic in your yard

Get a nice blanket, a picnic basket, some flowers, and head into the backyard for a picnic. The benefit of having a picnic in your own yard is that you can bring food that is a bit more intricate than peanut butter sandwiches.

4. Make a playlist and play board games

Hop on Spotify, Pandora, iTunes or whichever music service is your favorite and create a fun playlist for the night. Try to pick some songs you’ll both like. Not only will it make the night more fun but you might find something new to listen to together in the car. Then, break out your favorite board games and play as many games as you can until the music doesn’t keep you awake anymore.

5. Watch awful movies

I stress the “awful” part here because watching movies isn’t really the best way to spend time together unless you don’t feel like talking. Picking cheesy movies, bad movies, or movies you’ve both seen a million times will encourage you to talk during and laugh at the movie together rather than sitting in silence.

6. Tour a new country

Not literally. But you can be adventurous right at home. Make a tempura and miso soup dinner while listening to Japanese pop music. Then head into the living room and watch some highly respected Japanese cinema (Akira Kurosawa for serious films, Hayao Miyazaki for feel-good animated movies). Or if you’re more into Europe, make French-inspired cuisine while listening to cabaret and watch some high-brow French cinema afterward.

7. Camp in your yard

Camping out isn’t just fun with the kids. It’s a great way to spend quality time with your significant other by staying away from technology (i.e., Facebook and email). Pitch a tent and fill it with blankets and pillows, a lantern, games, snacks, and whatever else will keep you busy.

Living in a Mobile Home Neighborhood

People who have lived in a subdivision may find it easier to adjust to living in a mobile home park, especially if they relocate to a mobile home park that’s moments away from public transportation, businesses and stores. Another way to adjust to living in a mobile home park is to buy a home in a small park, a neighborhood that has 15 or fewer mobile homes in it.

Besides location, another factor that determines what you can expect while living in a mobile home community is the styles of the homes. Large mobile homes look like traditional houses, some of the homes being built with two stories. The look and feel of these mobile home communities is very similar to a typical neighborhood.

People mistakenly undervalue mobile home communities

Yet, there are differences that living in a mobile home community brings. If you live in a community whose residents are confident and positively contributing to society, adjustments that you might have to make include:

  • Working with a cable television provider to install underground cable so that you can watch your favorite cable channels.
  • Paying higher utility bills, especially higher electric bills, if you buy a mobile home that was made before the late 1990s. Utility bills at an older mobile home could run you several thousand dollars a year extra. To reduce your utility bills more, try heating your home with solar panels. Just make sure that the savings isn’t offset by high solar panel installment costs.
  • Rent to own mobile homes can make home ownership more affordable. As with any deal, read the small print. Look for rent to own contracts that allow you to recoup a portion of your investment should you decide not to buy the mobile home.
  • Although it’s your home, you may have to pay a monthly pet fee, similar to how you pay a fee to keep a pet in an apartment. Because mobile homes tend to be placed close together, ask for maximum size dogs that are allowed in the mobile home park you’re considering buying a house in. If you’re not a fan of dogs, you might want to avoid moving to a park that permits large dogs or dogs that love to bark to move in.
  • During severe weather, you and your neighbors’ nerves might get frayed. Should storms become especially strong, pay attention to local government and weather instructions. Vacate the mobile home park if necessary. You could always return after the storm passes. Buy a mobile home that’s built with 100% drywall, quality siding, reliable thermal windows and solid roofing to improve the chances that your home won’t incur damage during mild storms. Also, opt for a mobile home that meets the latest building codes.
  • You’ll still have to pay property taxes.
  • Because your homes are close to each other, you might find it easier to get to know your neighbors.

Mobile homes don’t determine a person’s behavior. Caring, intelligent and cultural people live at mobile home parks. In fact, some parks are quiet and very well kept. As with any community, ask neighbors what it’s like living in the particular mobile home park. Also, ask realtors and mobile home managers about the neighbors. You could move into a retirement community, a depressed neighborhood, a vacation area or an upscale mobile home park.